Legal Ways to Get High

 
Legal Ways to Get High

Legal Ways to Get High

 

It’s become increasingly common, in recent years, for young people to search for legal ways to get high. Manufacturers of synthetic, “legal” drugs like spice and bath salts are raking in the cash by responding to that demand, and law enforcement officials are struggling to respond to the flood of legal drugs on the market.  The problem is that these so-called legal drugs can be highly dangerous, and young people around the country are being hospitalized for bad reactions to these “legal” highs.

Here are the some of the most popular legal ways to get high:

 1. Synthetic Marijuana– Legal pot is also known as Spice, K2, Genie Silver and Yucatan Fire. It is sold as “incense” and labeled “not for human consumption.” These herbal mixtures are infused with chemicals that activate the same receptors as marijuana. The side effects, however, are much more drastic. Smoking legal pot can produce a strong high as well as psychosis, rapid heartbeat, seizures, and even death. The American Association of Poison Control has observed over a 50% increase in calls related to legal pot this year compared to last.

2. Bath Salts – Bath salts are sold legally online and in drug paraphernalia stores under a variety of names, such as “Ivory Wave,” “Purple Wave,” “Red Dove,” “Blue Silk,” “Zoom,” “Bloom,” “Cloud Nine,” “Ocean Snow,” “Lunar Wave,” “Vanilla Sky,” “White Lightning,” “Scarface,” and “Hurricane Charlie.” Because formulations of bath salts change so often in an attempt to keep ahead of laws prohibiting their manufacture, very little is known about the chemical makeup of the drug. What we do know is that bath salts contain synthetic stimulant drugs of the amphetamine and cathinone classes, such as methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MPDV), mephedrone and pyrovalerone.   Many bath salt users compare their effects to methamphetamine. These drugs are typically administered orally, by insufflation, by inhalation, or by injection, with the worst outcomes apparently associated with snorting or intravenous administration.

Law enforcement officials are alarmed at the effects of these drugs, which have been known to cause paranoia and intense hallucinations. Emergency room personnel report that patients who have ingested bath salts are so highly agitated and violent that they sometimes require a whole medical team to restrain them. Sometimes even powerful sedatives are not sufficient in calming these people down. Bath started turning up regularly in the United States last year and have proliferated in recent months, alarming doctors, who say they have unusually dangerous and long-lasting effects.

3. Cough Medication: Cough formulations containing the drug dextromethorphane (DXM) are also used as a legal way to get high. DXM containing formulations are usually known on the street as “triple C’s” (as the medication is used to treat cold, cough, and congestion) and use of DXM is sometimes called “robo-tripping” (as the DXM containing medication Robotussin is commonly used). At high levels, DXM acts as a dissociative hallucinogenic. Some users say the effect is similar to those produced by ketamine and PCP. It can produce visual hallucinations, dissociations, excitement, and a loss of sense of time. DXM can also cause nausea, vomiting, and difficulty breathing.

Disclaimer: These were gathered from the websites various websites on the Internet and we do not condone or support any means of getting high; whether legal or illegal. Use at your own risk. This article is for informational purposes only.

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